Archives for April 2012

I Don’t Know How She Does It – Part 3

It’s part three of the five part series we’re running on the blog, sovaldi and this week Christine talks about the guilt we experience as working parents and how our professional life can enhance every other aspect of our lives.

If you’re enjoying the series, troche you might want to  WIN one of four SIGNED copies of Christine’s book. To do so simply sign-up to receive email notifications of all my new blog posts straight to your inbox and / or follow me @workingsupermum on Twitter  and  Tweet ‘I want to win with @workingsupermum’ and link to any of the I don’t know How she does it’ posts on my blog / or ‘Like’ the Super Mummy Facebook page via the links on the right or leave a comment with your thoughts below this article.

Plenty of ways to win!

Competition closes at 5pm on 15th May 2012 and four winners will be selected at random.  Good Luck!

Women in Business: Getting to Grips with the Guilt Trip by Christine Brown-Quinn

How can you possibly have a career and a personal life and not feel guilty that someone is getting short changed?  Is it a no win situation which just can’t be resolved?  Sorry for the cliche, but it’s actually a win-win situation.

First, let’s take a look at your personal life. You have a lot of commitments, right? But isn’t this what makes you feel connected to this earth?  Commitments are a good thing – you may have a commitment to a sports team, a local school, a charity or a family matter. These commitments take you away from work, both mentally and physically. (Again, this is also a good thing which I’ll come back to later). Your instinct is that your priorities are in the right place, but you still feel guilty leaving clients or colleagues with unfinished business.

Now let’s take a look at your professional life.  You are no doubt enjoying the challenge and collaboration of working with other adults.  Knowing you, I bet you’re really throwing yourself into the new job, the new role, or project.  But I hear you. You’re telling me that despite this job satisfaction you still do experience that tinge (or on a bad day, that pang) of guilt that you should be home having a glass of wine with your partner or reading that bedtime story with your kids.

Well, if it’s any consolation we’ve all been there. The point is you’re not alone and it’s not personal – it’s part of the human predicament.  It’s  part of what defines us and you’ve got to stop beating yourself up about it. It’s not your fault, so there’s absolutely no reason why you should feel guilty!

Kate Redding, the working mom played by Sarah Jessica Parker in the film I don’t know how she does it, demonstrates beautifully that so much of the guilt we experience is self-imposed. We set unrealistic expectations of what we can achieve – whether that be at home or at work.  Kate seems to feel guilty about everything and as a result she seems almost scatter-brained and unfocused in almost every situation. Her guilt seems to be driving her to be uber human.  (She really stoops low when she dresses up a store-bought cake as homemade for the school bake sale. She doesn’t want her kids to feel like she’s contributing less than the other mothers. Oh, please!).  In a way we set ourselves up for feeling a sense of failure, a sense of guilt, because we can’t meet a pie in the sky expectation.

Ok, so although you buy into my logic, you’re still not over it.

Here’s the real key to getting to grips with the guilt trip. What you have to realize is that it’s because of your personal life (rather than in spite of!) that you’re a better professional, a better business person. People like to deal with other people. The unique approach, values and integrity you bring to the work environment are your greatest contributions. Your uniqueness comes from your personal life, your upbringing and your personal experiences.  Also having a personal life pulls you away from work – it saves you from burn-out (I saw plenty of this in my corporate life!).  It allows you to break away and recharge your battery, which of course makes you more productive in the long run. Ever notice how much easier something feels once you’ve had that mental break?

Fine, I get all that, but I still feel guilty about not spending enough time with my partner.  I feel guilty about leaving the kids. Did you ever think about how your professional life makes you an interesting person – how it broadens your perspective? Have you ever thought about how your professional life enables you to support your partner’s career (you realize just how tough it is out there in the real world!)  So many skills and qualities that you apply in your personal life have actually been developed in your work life.  You’ve got it – your professional life makes you a better person – you as a partner, daughter, friend or mother. You can help your relatives and close friends get out of those tricky situations because you solve problems at work all day long!

Bottom line?  Although you want perfection, just focusing on that one thing doesn’t get you there either.  Once you accept that you can’t possibly be everywhere and do everything, and also accept that it’s the varied dimensions in your life that might it worth living, you’re well on the road to recovery.  No more guilt.  Time to enjoy life’s variety!

This blog is part 3 of a 5-part series: I don’t know how she does it. For other blogs connected to this series, click here.

Silent Sunday – The learning process

Silent Sunday

Say what? The things mums say.

Did you brush your teeth?
You missed a bit. Is it jam?
Pick the towel up off the floor please.
Can someone switch that tap off.
The money for your school trip is in your bag.
No, ed your school bag.
In an envelope that says ‘school trip money’
No you can’t have a chocolate egg you’ve just eaten breakfast.
We’re leaving after Peppa.
Shoes on please.
There are no strawberries.
How did those shoes get so filthy?
Shoes off please until I clean them.
I’ve not see your cow. Isn’t it in the farm box?
Why would I take it to work?
I don’t have your cow. I promise.
We’re leaving after THIS Peppa.
Here you go, put your shoes back on.
I’m just putting bags in the car.
What’s going in in here? Can I not leave you for a minute?!
Pick the popcorn up.
We’ll have some after lunch.
No, it’s not lunch time yet.
I don’t know what’s for dinner yet, you’ve just ate breakfast.
Don’t drink your sisters milk.
She doesn’t have germs, she just needs to drink her own milk so we can leave.
Switch off the tv.
Put your cup by the sink.
Two hands please. Careful!
Careful.
Walkings not boring. It’s good for you.
Go in the buggy then.
Are you going in the buggy?
You just got in the buggy! I thought walking was boring?.
Watch the puddle.
Walk round the puddle.
ROUND the puddle not through the middle.
It’s in your bag. Envelope says ‘school trip money’
Why didn’t you go before we left the house?
You’ll just have to wait.
Macaroni Cheese.
You liked it last week.
I’m not joking.
Shoes off please.
Don’t leave them there.
Where they always go.
Put. Your. Shoes. In. The. Box.
What do you mean ‘you broke the radiator?’
Sit nicely, feet off the sofa.
Did you do your maths homework?
Bring me your book.
Excellent reading. Stop chewing your plaits.
No, you can’t play a game on my phone.
Why is your cardigan screwed up in a ball in your bag?
Put it in your wardrobe.
It’s not dirty.
That’s dirty, pick it up and put it in the wash basket.
Wear the grey one instead.
You’ll freeze, it’s bitter out there.
Cold. Very cold.
Give me a kiss. Love you.
Close the door.
Don’t run. Walk please. WALK IN THE HOUSE PLEASE.
Choose a banana instead.
I’ll think about it.
If you eat your dinner.
I said I’d think about it.
Slow down and tell me again.
Who is ‘she?’ that’s your sister you’re talking about.
Sometimes things aren’t fair.
I don’t care who started it. Cut it out.
Use your fork please.
Use your fork.
Fork.
Careful you don’t spill….
Don’t worry, here’s a cloth.
Three more bites.
Another one.
I’m still thinking about it.
Don’t call from the other room. Come here so I can hear you.
Yes, that’s fine.
Yes, really.
Go, before I change my mind.
Where’s my phone?
Who has my phone?
Ask Daddy.
Put it in the wash basket.
Underneath the towel on the bathroom floor.
Guys! Stop that, it’s dangerous.
It means someone could get hurt.
Again? You are always hungry.
You’ve never tried it.
It’s good for you.
No, that’s bad for you.
Because I said so.
Did Daddy wash your hair last night?
With what?
The green bottle? I thought it looked greasy.
Close your eyes then and it won’t sting.
Right, scrub til they are gleaming.
Yes, very good. Shiny.
It doesn’t need a plaster. I can’t really see it.
He was last on your sisters bed.
Have you seen the Dinosaur?
Stop it!
I said Stop it!
It doesn’t smell.
Cuddle up here then. Move over.
I’ll sit in the middle. Save any fighting.
We did your book first last night.
Well, ask Daddy instead.
Don’t make me count to five.
One.
Two.
Fine, but move over.
Stop picking it.
It’s fine.
Right, go wash your hands. I told you to leave it.
Listen!
Now!
Here, give me a cuddle.
It’s fine.
I love you.
Put your book away.
In the bookcase.
You’ll slip on it.
Yes.
Yes.
No.
I love you.
Ask Daddy in the morning.
Ready Brek?
Well see how you feel in the morning.
Five more minutes.
Sweet dreams cherub.
Who’s up?
Just remember to flush.
Hands!
Get back to bed.
Bed.
UNDER the duvet.
I’ll leave it open a little.
Back to bed.
Sweet dreams.
Did you hear him snoring?
Cute.
She’s out for the count.
Angelic girl.
Wine?!

The secret to becomming a natural-born charmer

Exclusive invite to Super Mummy readers, cialis sale brought to you via the ‘Women in Business Superseries’

The secret to becoming a natural-born charmer

“Ever wonder how celebrities like Oprah Winfrey, mind Barbara Walters and Piers Morgan became so popular? In our experience there always seems to be one person in the office too who seems to get along with everyone and they make it look so easy, don’t they? How annoying! What do they know that the rest of us don’t?”

Join this free, invitation only webinar on Thursday 3rd May 2012  11.30 – 12.00 (GMT) to find out.  

I want to join, register me now, thanks!

I Don’t Know How She Does It – Part 2

In Part 1 of this I don’t know how she does it series, sales  brought to you by Christine Brown-Quinn, she talked about how you need to stop trying to be Superwoman – learn to let go (stop micromanaging!) and give others a chance to grow and develop both at home and at work.  This second part takes a closer look at how this applies when it comes to looking after your kids.

To WIN one of four SIGNED copies of Christine’s book simply sign-up to receive email notifications of all my new blog posts straight to your inbox and / or follow me @workingsupermum on Twitter  and  Tweet ‘I want to win with @workingsupermum’ / or ‘Like’ the Super Mummy Facebook page via the links on the right or leave a comment with your thoughts below this article. Phew! Lots of ways to win!

Competition closes at 5pm on 15th May 2012 and four winners will be selected at random.  Good Luck!

 

Super Manage Your Childcare – My Top 3 Tips by Christine Brown-Quinn

Anyone who juggles work and family knows that the childcare arrangement is one of the most critical things to get right if you want your life to run smoothly – it’s the linchpin. “Well, if you can afford it, just hire an expensive nanny,” you say and “its’ all sorted.” Sorry, money certainly helps, but it’s not what makes or breaks the situation. YOUR people skills and management skills are what counts. Just like at work, simply paying someone doesn’t mean they’ll perform. As humans, we’re a lot more complicated than that.

Whatever your arrangement – nursery school, childcare in the provider’s home, or some sort of help in your home, whether it be a nanny, grandmother, or perhaps student – think about how you would like to be treated if you were the one being hired to look after somebody else’s kids. Also is there anything you’ve learned in your professional environment about working with people – how to motivate, work effectively in teams, resolve conflict, resolve problems – that might also be useful when it comes to interacting with the person looking after your most precious asset?

You’ve got it. IT’S EXACTLY THESE PEOPLE SKILLS THAT YOU USE IN YOUR WORK ENVIRONMENT THAT YOU NEED TO USE WHEN MANAGING YOUR CHILD CARE ARRANGEMENT.

Here are my top three strategies:

1. Manage the relationship day by day – Don’t let problems boil over. Deal with them as they arise. There’s a scene in the film I don’t know how she does, where Mom Kate comes back from a business trip and her husband Richard says they need to talk to the nanny about her being late all the time. Kate screams, “No! I don’t want her to leave.” Tiptoeing around these kind of sensitive issues may avoid some pain in the short term, but in the longer term it only makes the pain that much worse. By not dealing with issues as they arise, you are also setting a dangerous precedent. In this case Kate & Richard are saying it’s ok to be late and are opening up the door to other potentially unwelcome behaviour.

2. Empower the carer – In another scene Kate’s on a business trip and she’s about to go into a very big meeting. She gets a call on her cell phone from her nanny who’s after a telephone number to arrange a play date. Understandably so, Kate is frazzled and searches her handbag looking for some sort scribbled note. Kate clearly is trying to manage the play date and her big deadlines at work. Is this really necessary? Isn’t Kate causing her own stress? Empower the childcare provider to take responsibility for this kind of detail. After all, you’ve got other things on your mind and that’s why she is likely to do a better job than you. Just like at work, when you empower people, they feel appreciated and trusted and are able to handle the situation brilliantly. They figure out how to do things on their own.

The payback is huge when you follow this principle. Currently we have a university student (Callum) who picks our 11 year old son Zach up from school and helps him with his homework. I make it clear that it’s Zach’s responsibility to get his work done and Callum’s responsibility is to support him. When we get feedback from the school that a certain piece of work is done well or not so well – we share that with Callum too and by doing so make it clear that he shares in Zach’s successes and’ not so good’ results.

I always ask Callum for his views – eg how can we motivate Zach to do his work more quickly (he has a tendency to let his mind wander like any healthy 11 year old boy.) What’s his response? He suggests great ideas like promising to play football if there’s enough time after Zach completes his homework. Does Callum feel empowered and personally responsible? You bet he does! The irony is when you give people personal responsibility, their job satisfaction goes up – they feel like they make a difference. The upside for you is your time is freed up and it’s a real joy to see others develop. (I’m even teaching Callum how to cook!)

3. Support the carer’s authority – Empowering also means that you need to be careful not to undermine the childcare provider’s authority. I’m sure you don’t like it at work when you’re given a job to do, but then somebody comes along and completely undermines the direction and actions you’ve taken. Always support the carer’s actions, especially in front of the kids. If you have a disagreement, you need to deal with that offline.

Mom Kate in the film loves to avoid conflict. When the nanny takes her son to get his first haircut, she never discusses with the nanny that she’d prefer to be part of these “first” moments. With some discussion and planning lots of things are possible. I remember many times with our two older kids that I had to have a quiet word with the carer about restrictions on television or snack food, usually because the carer was new. Children are natural arbitrageurs!

The biggest gift your childcare provider gives you is the opportunity for you to be you. Without this trusted partner, you can’t go out in the world and show your full talents. Like any relationship it’s a two-way street and this one certainly deserves day-to-day managing and investing. You won’t regret the long-term rewards!

This blog is part 2 of a 5-part series.

Silent Sunday

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Family Days Out – Edinburgh Science Festival

Keeping a five year old princess and her pal entertained is no mean feat. I mean, buy it’s not up there with understanding Einstein’s Theory of Relativity but it can be tough going, ask particularly on a rainy day in the Easter school holidays.  Cue a day trip to the City Art Centre which becomes a science playground during the Edinburgh Science Festival. Six floors, seven hours, and over twenty different workshops, shows and interactive events to partake in, we were set for a jam packed day. Top on our agenda were the Splat-Tastic and Jungle Safari workshops which we’d pre-booked ahead of our visit to ensure we weren’t disappointed.

Jungle Safari first and our intrepid explorers donned the requisite camouflage safari kit and off they went, leaving me and my accompanying friend free to have coffee for a whole 40 minutes – a luxury these days. If only we’d known that we couldn’t join the kids on their safari, we’d not have had that first cafe stop on arrival where we’d practically had to glue the kids to their seats given they were bouncing off the walls with excitement and anticipation of the day ahead.

 

In honesty a little part of me was disappointed that I couldn’t join in the safari, yet relieved at the same time (well, there might have been actual snakes.) The two jungle buddies joined back up with us after their mini safari exclaiming that it was great but declaring as only five year olds can that they didn’t know what their favourite part about it was.  We established there were dolphin noises, lots of listening in and not a snake in sight. Phew!

With our slime making session scheduled for the afternoon we were free to roam and drop into any other session taking our fancy.  Nina and the Neurons was less than inspiring unfortunately with the ‘Ninas’ needing to up the ante on their enthusiasm and engagement of the kids who were really interested in learning about their senses but disappointed when they were asked if they wanted to colour in instead.  A quick word in the ear from one mummy (I’ll let you guess who) and the Nina’s decided that a Sneeze Workshop was in order.  With an instrument shaped like an inverted nostril and a bundle of brightly coloured feathers to act as the irritants in the nasal canal, there was much sneezing and indeed giggling to be had. Result at last.

 

All Nina’d out, the pull of standing in pod and being surrounded by a giant bubble in the rather damp World of Bubbles was too much to resist.  I did however let the little one go first and only when she had her turn did I step in. Such a simple idea really sparked a whole lot of intrigue in the nippers and so further time was spent with elbows in bubbly water, with no dishes to speak off, but plenty of weird and wonderful shaped giant bubbles floating above our heads.

 

The draw of the ‘moving stairs ‘(escalators) took us to the next floor and our next creative stop – this time Shadowgrams Photolab.  This was my favourite of all activities.  Choosing from a range of junk objects, creating a mini masterpiece on a glass board and then exposing the pattern onto photographic paper in the dark room was a bit hit with us.  One Monster Truck, one Flower Garden later and a stint in the dark room and our two little ones were happy as Larry with their Photolab experience.  Their outputs were pretty impressive too.

 

The Rampaging Chariots Race was the next stop for our two eager beavers, both keen to get in on the action and drive a readymade robot round an obstacle course with a tilting bridge as its final challenge. We had to wait patiently for this one as it was proving to be popular, but it was worth it to watch my daughter stick her tongue out ever so slightly as her father does when he is concentrating and daintily but confidently guide her robot round the race course to victory.

The afternoon sessions quelled any feelings of post lunch lethargy we might have had, starting with the amazingly clever and hugely scientific Chain Reactor.  We watched in wonder as a puff of donut shaped air triggered the pouring of liquid through a filter and set off a series of knock-on chemical reactions and pretty nifty effects culminating in a joyous clang of a billiard ball on a cymbal and rapturous applause from the audience. So good, we watched it a second time, and still guffawed at the corny gags the mad scientist in charge of the reactor doled out just for us big kids.

Next up, and last for us on the days billing was Splat-Tastic. The making and testing of our very own slime was made more appealing by the option of creating disco ball slime.  With the complicated and tricky addition of a good sprinkling of glitter, the gooey slime took on a whole new form of girly sparkliness. The goggles and latex gloves provided a bit of a challenge for my daughter who simply wanted to roll up her sleeves and get stuck in. Equally my mishearing of the initial introduction to ‘learning about polymers’ meant I was fairly confused when an hour later there was still no mention of Olly Murs and his relation to gooey disco ball slime, but neither mishap stopped us from finishing our day on a high with a good old splatting of the large target board with our very own slime creations.

 

Whatever the age group, there was something to suit everyone at the City Art Centre. Next year we might be brave enough to take our youngest and let them loose amidst all that science and creativity. By then the five year olds will be seasoned pro’s and will show them exactly how it’s done.

The final word comes from one very tired little princess, who on the train ride home announced to all and sundry that her day out has been quite simply ‘Exsplastic!

How’s that for creativity?

 

I Don’t Know How She Does It – Part 1

Christine Brown-Quinn knows what she is talking about when it comes to managing career and family. The author of Step Aside Super Woman, sick Career &  Family is for Any Woman reflects on her own personal experiences and draws upon those in the ‘I Don’t Know How She Does It’ movie starring Sarah Jessica Parker as Kate Reddy, the working mother in Allison Pearson’s book that inspired the film.

I’m delighted to be collaborating with Christine’s and bringing you this five part blog series over the course of the next few weeks to share with you some of those wise words that might just help you get the balance without the need for your Super hero cape.

To WIN one of four SIGNED copies of Christine’s book simply sign-up to receive email notifications of all my new blog posts straight to your inbox and / or follow me @workingsupermum on Twitter  and  Tweet ‘I want to win with @workingsupermum’ / or ‘Like’ the Super Mummy Facebook page via the links on the right or leave a comment with your thoughts below this article. Phew! Lots of ways to win!

Competition closes at 5pm on 15th May 2012 and four winners will be selected at random.  Good Luck!

 

Sinking Superwoman –  learning that ‘OK’ is good enough – By Christine Brown-Quinn

Have you seen Sarah Jessica Parker’s latest film I Don’t Know How She Does It?

I know how she does it because I do it. But, I’m no Superwoman. It’s the team that I have around me that does it –  my husband, our childcare provider and our kids all pitch in and make the career-family thing work.  When I was first starting out and doing the juggling act of career and family over 20 years ago, it certainly did feel like I did it.  But the downside was I also felt like everything was solely my responsibility. 

Like working mom Kate Reddy in the film (played by Sarah Jessica Parker) I used to feel that I singlehandedly had to hold it all together. How was I going to make the school meeting and meet the deadline at work? How was I going to get the promotion and still take full control at home.  How was I going to have the time and energy to bake a cake for the cake sale having worked another 10-hour day. I’m sure you get the picture.

The funny thing was my husband never said that it was all up to me. I made this assumption. I put this unrealistic expectation on myself that I had to be perfect home and perfect at work.  The day I stopped trying to be Superwoman (for the benefit of my own health and therefore for the benefit of everyone around me) was the day I started enjoying my life as a mother, wife, and professional. I realised that unless I changed my mindset I was headed straight for a meltdown.

What I also realised was that I was putting my personal life in one box and my working life in another without taking advantage of any transfer of skills between the two environments. I was gaining some fantastic management skills at work which I wasn’t using at home: delegation, prioritization, working in teams and managing teams just to name a few.  I admit that when it comes to delegation, it’s sometimes hard to give up control, especially at home. Let’s face it. You do do things better than most people.  No argument there. However, if you try to do most things all by yourself, you will burn out.  Constantly striving for perfection in every aspect of your life leads to a miserable existence.  Like Kate Reddy’s husband Richard says in the film, “OK, is good enough”.

Did you ever think about what you’re like when you act like a control freak? I have. Do your kids like you? Does your childcare provider like you? Does your partner like you? Let others in. Let them help out. Make them feel appreciated as part of the team.  Get them to own some of the problems and challenges. And yes they will do things differently, but don’t sweat the detail. We often criticize our partners for not helping out. And then when they do help out, but they don’t do things exactly like we do, we criticize them for that too! My husband’s approach and style to managing things at home is very different from mine, but no less valid (although I still think my way is better!) But the point is, I do let him get on with it and I try not to interfere. He’s a smart man. Why do I think I need to treat him like an idiot?

So by adopting this team approach, does this mean your life will be perfect? No, life is never perfect.  Sorry to break this to you. By adopting the team approach, however,  you can sustain a rewarding lifestyle that combines your career ambitions with a fulfilling family life.  Do it now. Let go. Ahhh. Doesn’t that feel better?

 

I lost my blogging groove

The kids being poorly was all it took for me to lose my blogging groove. There I was starting to get into a nice swing of posting three sometimes four times weekly, see with a good mix of the usual ‘Life of Family Super’ stories, reviews of family days out in my new series and participation in my favourite linkys. People wanted to collaborate with me, I had competition prizes to give away, guest posts to publish, Science Festivals to blog about. My Twitter followers were on the up, all organic growth, people who seemed to genuinely want to follow me on the basis of those 140 characters that tell Tweeps who I am and what I’m all about. I had ideas and banks of posts stored between my Notes app, my WP app and somewhere in the reservoir of memory between buying milk and remortgaging the house.

But then the little monster took unwell, nothing majorly serious, thankfully but a trip to out of hours doctors following some midnight hallucinations (which I’m sure will be funny at some point, but just not quite yet) and I just lost interest. Mother Lioness had instinctively kicked in of course, and my time and attentions were being spent on nursing the little guy back to his usual monstrous self. Sitting on a sofa for 10 hours on the trot with a burning hot little person who doesn’t want to let you out of their sight can make you think a lot. A lot. Dipping in and out of twitter on my iPhone when on nap breaks and when my right hand was free from the clutches of his tiny sweaty palms, I could see a hive of activity from fellow bloggers who were writing funny, entertaining, thought provoking reads and it made me feel a bit sh*t.

I set out on this blogging journey because I love to write. I love my family, and by combining the two I could write and keep a log of ‘the things that them two do’ in the process.

But then people wanted to collaborate with me, I had competition prizes to give away, guest posts to publish and Science festivals to blog about. The banks of posts were building up (but never quite making it to the blog) Twitter followers were increasing (with it the pressure to engage more, be funnier, wittier. Be liked (?) And then the little man got ill. And I had time to reflect, to ponder, to think. Why do I do it? Who do I do it for? Am I getting what I want from it? Am I any good? Why don’t PRs send me products? Whats my rating this week? Do any of these things matter?

So Sunday came. I wrote ‘On holiday for a week. See you soon’ on a piece of paper and posted that as my Silent Sunday blog post. I could have easily written ‘Having a hiatus. This isn’t the important stuff.’ but I knew somewhere that my blogging groove would ‘get in’ again soon. It keeps me sane in our mad busy world. It distracts me from washing the kitchen floor or sorting out the new mortgage. But most of all, it’s mine. Whether two, two hundred or two thousand people want to read what I have to say, it’s neither here nor there. And who needs a free travel bum wiping snot clearing machine to review anyway when ‘Family Super’ can have our own damn fun inventing one?!

Are you a blogger who lost their groove? Did your blogging mojo go AWOL? How did you get it back?

Silent Sunday

 

Silent Sunday

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